Mackerel shmackerel*

*this represents the views of the author.

They ate mackerel fillets there last friday night, the boy and his dad.  I believe mackerel was grilled, some baby new potatoes were steamed and off they went.  I’m also told that fillets don’t have bones in them, that the 3 fillets cost under €3 in Superquinn, and that the smaller boy manages the potatoes easily when quartered.

harumph

I really thought I could convince Dominic’s dad to write the meaty & fishy posts for this blog, but that never came to pass.  Dom isn’t vegetarian, not yet, so I don’t just want to show a one-sided view of what he eats.  But save telling you the facts, I can’t share much else.  I don’t cook it and I won’t, but I do want to help others that are starting off BLW with their kids, or just trying to come up with different ideas for feeding their own families.  So I’ll keep telling you what Dominic eats.  Just don’t expect me to be super happy about it…

Jill

Something smells a bit fishy.

Barry was no ordinary fish

There’s no denying the goodness of fish.  Personally, I like them to keep their goodness all to themselves but I hear if you consume such things they’re chocka full of omega 3’s and what not, especially the oily fish kind.  Pity their greasiness doesn’t allow them slip away from nets…

Dominic’s favourite fish is Barry The Fish With Fingers.  But his Dad thinks it’s okay to eat other, less talented fish, and thusly consulted his new bible, the Baby Led Weaning cookbook.   Tuna croquettes were on the menu.  His top tip for speed is chop up the spuds & steam them in the microwave.  These were very quick to make, and after Mark sliced them into discs Dom nommed them up that way.  I think I spent more time cleaning potato & flaky tuna off the floor than he spent making them.  Then I gave the other tin of tuna to the cats, the bang* off it is woeful.

Then last sunday, while I revelled in delight at finding Cauldron tofu in Tesco (really firm, definitely the easiest to cook with, but not always available), Mark was slipping peppered mackerel fillets in the basket.   They ate them up on the next night with steamed babycorn & mangetout.  The packet said may contain traces of bone, but after a thorough combing through turns out they were actually bone-free.  Again, he ate small flaky bits with his hands.  The way he eats baby corn is really cute, its like an adult eating corn on the cob.  The tiny bits come back out with the sides nibbled off.

In case you’ve wondered, I don’t handle the meat/fish side of things at all, cooking or health & safety like bone removal.  I stand there making myself a little meal for one while father and son tuck in.  I don’t even like cleaning up after it, but then, when have I ever said I enjoy cleaning?

– jill

*bang is an irishism for smell, dear alien-readers.

Something smells a bit fishy.

Barry was no ordinary fish

There’s no denying the goodness of fish.  Personally, I like them to keep their goodness all to themselves but I hear if you consume such things they’re chocka full of omega 3’s and what not, especially the oily fish kind.  Pity their greasiness doesn’t allow them slip away from nets…

Dominic’s favourite fish is Barry The Fish With Fingers.  But his Dad thinks it’s okay to eat other, less talented fish, and thusly consulted his new bible, the Baby Led Weaning cookbook.   Tuna croquettes were on the menu.  His top tip for speed is chop up the spuds & steam them in the microwave.  These were very quick to make, and after Mark sliced them into discs Dom nommed them up that way.  I think I spent more time cleaning potato & flaky tuna off the floor than he spent making them.  Then I gave the other tin of tuna to the cats, the bang* off it is woeful.

Then last sunday, while I revelled in delight at finding Cauldron tofu in Tesco (really firm, definitely the easiest to cook with, but not always available), Mark was slipping peppered mackerel fillets in the basket.   They ate them up on the next night with steamed babycorn & mangetout.  The packet said may contain traces of bone, but after a thorough combing through turns out they were actually bone-free.  Again, he ate small flaky bits with his hands.  The way he eats baby corn is really cute, its like an adult eating corn on the cob.  The tiny bits come back out with the sides nibbled off.

In case you’ve wondered, I don’t handle the meat/fish side of things at all, cooking or health & safety like bone removal.  I stand there making myself a little meal for one while father and son tuck in.  I don’t even like cleaning up after it, but then, when have I ever said I enjoy cleaning?

– jill

*bang is an irishism for smell, dear alien-readers.