Puttin’ up The Dinner: sweet potato tuna croquettes

Croquetteish
Croquetteish

Mama cuts up colouredy things while I sit in my chair and shout at her.  And then she puts things in the hot-hot-hot water and then puts it all together and that’s called dinner and we all eat it and I throw a bit aswell.

Sometimes Dada makes dinner, when Mama says she sounds like Mammó used to saying “I just wish for once someone would put a dinner up in front of me”.  But when Dada was going to make my food instead he had to work hard in his office and then Mama had to make it for all her boys instead.

Mama said Yuck Yuck Yuck and opened the smelly tin of pink stuff and gave some to the meooowss.  Then she made the spuddies and she made spuddy-spuddies and the orange ones I love too, and she mashed them all together. She mixed it all up and made it bready on the outside.

Then Dada arrived in and me and the Dom-bomb and him ate them all up. It was my first time having them but they eated them before lots. Dada said he mixes an egg in too when he makes them.  Mama had sadface and made her own din-dins.

Theo

Tuna Croquettes (adapted from the Baby Led Weaning Cookbook)

2 large potatoes (I used 1 regular, 1 sweet)

185 g can tuna

1 tbsp lemon juice

2 tbsp butter

1/2-1 cup breadcrumbs (2 slices of wholemeal whizzed up in blender)

Directions

1. Steam or boil potatoes.

2. Preheat oven to 200c and lightly grease a large baking sheet.

3. Drain the tuna and break it up.

4. When the potatoes are cooked, drain and mash them and add the tuna. Add the lemon juice & butter and mix.

This is where the husband adds in an egg – mine were a bit squidgy, which might have been the sweet potato, but he reckons they bind better with the egg.

5. Shape the mixture into small sausages then roll each one in the breadcrumbs and put on the baking sheet.

6. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes, until browned and cooked through.

Risotto. Italian for yum.

We’re big fans of risotto in our house.  It used to be one of those things that we thought was really hard, or time consuming, but it’s actually not.   Especially now –   Mark tried out the BLW cookbook oven-cooked one with aubergine & courgette a while ago, as opposed to the stand and stir variety and we actually found it nicer – less stodgy and clumpy.  It’s definitely  less effort too.

After a lovely long zoo trip the other day, when Dom was almost running on empty – tired out from animals, slides & other kids  – we thought a variation on the oven cooked risotto starring what ever was in the fridge/garden would go down a treat.

Mark set to getting onions, garlic & peppers on the pan, while I went into the garden.  Yes, dear reader, I harvested a few little carrots, and some sage and parsley.  The pride!  I was bursting with it.   Now, I don’t think Tesco will come a-calling with orders any day soon, but I don’t care, my double-pronged carroty wonders were awesome.  Except the one with the approx 18 inch long root, for what lay beneath was a miserable greeny tinged number.  There’s a lesson there somewhere.

Hurry up and take photo so I can eat.

The carrots softened nicely in the 20 mins in the oven, as all the stock goes in at once so they get a chance to cook through.  This means I don’t have to go picking out crunchy carrot bits from Dom’s dinner.

Risotto is a brilliant BLW food.   You can use low salt stock, get a variety of vegetables and cheesiness into junior. It sticks nicely to spoons and forks and little hands.  Our friend Tina over at Cookwithtina.com was enquiring about freezing risotto on The Twitter the other day, but I honestly can’t say I’ve ever tried – ours is always gone with one sitting & one batch of leftovers.

– Jill

here’s a tip for you

"thoughtful with quorn"

BLW cookbook  – Meatballs in Tomato Sauce

Don’t try and make meatballs this using quorn mince!  I had a feeling this might happen, there’s no fat inherent in quorn mince to make the meatballs really stick together.  They had the usual egg & breadcrumbs, and looked like perfect roundy specimens as they chilled in the fridge.  But as soon as they hit the oil they kinda crumbled.  Figured in for a penny in for a pound and just crushed them all up.  So we had a good ol fashioned “mince”y tomatoey dinner.  And it was really tasty, simmered in the tomato sauce.

I’m guessing we’re not the first people to try making quorn mince meatballs though, so after a quick google, I’ve found this recipe on the Baby Led Weaning site, which involves smaller meatballs and baking them in the sauce so definitely going to try again.

It’s a little hard to judge whether Dominic likes things or not at the moment.  His current 2 top food related words nooooo & “moh?” (more).  No, in this case, doesn’t always mean no. He’ll often say it then happily keep eating, or take what you’ve offered.  More is usually a demand for more pasta, more grapes, or more yogurt.  He can have them!  “Wuh wuh” (water) is also fierce popular, but as much for its messing abilities as its thirst quenching goodness.  He often has snacks like a breadstick or a few grapes while we’re preparing dinner post creche.  It’s pretty hard when we get in the door from creche, throw the bags down and try to start dinner.  There’s only ever one parent home at that point, and it’s tough to chop and season and sauté while Dom stands arms up towards either you or the food cupboards.   So I might be filling him with snacks before dinner is ready.

We’re doing pretty well at meal planning at the moment.  We’ll have 4 things decided that we’ll make during the week, but we’re not good at making things in advance.  The furthest I’ll go is chopping some stuff before work in the morning. And in this house that’s ultra prepared…

Something smells a bit fishy.

Barry was no ordinary fish

There’s no denying the goodness of fish.  Personally, I like them to keep their goodness all to themselves but I hear if you consume such things they’re chocka full of omega 3’s and what not, especially the oily fish kind.  Pity their greasiness doesn’t allow them slip away from nets…

Dominic’s favourite fish is Barry The Fish With Fingers.  But his Dad thinks it’s okay to eat other, less talented fish, and thusly consulted his new bible, the Baby Led Weaning cookbook.   Tuna croquettes were on the menu.  His top tip for speed is chop up the spuds & steam them in the microwave.  These were very quick to make, and after Mark sliced them into discs Dom nommed them up that way.  I think I spent more time cleaning potato & flaky tuna off the floor than he spent making them.  Then I gave the other tin of tuna to the cats, the bang* off it is woeful.

Then last sunday, while I revelled in delight at finding Cauldron tofu in Tesco (really firm, definitely the easiest to cook with, but not always available), Mark was slipping peppered mackerel fillets in the basket.   They ate them up on the next night with steamed babycorn & mangetout.  The packet said may contain traces of bone, but after a thorough combing through turns out they were actually bone-free.  Again, he ate small flaky bits with his hands.  The way he eats baby corn is really cute, its like an adult eating corn on the cob.  The tiny bits come back out with the sides nibbled off.

In case you’ve wondered, I don’t handle the meat/fish side of things at all, cooking or health & safety like bone removal.  I stand there making myself a little meal for one while father and son tuck in.  I don’t even like cleaning up after it, but then, when have I ever said I enjoy cleaning?

– jill

*bang is an irishism for smell, dear alien-readers.

Something smells a bit fishy.

Barry was no ordinary fish

There’s no denying the goodness of fish.  Personally, I like them to keep their goodness all to themselves but I hear if you consume such things they’re chocka full of omega 3’s and what not, especially the oily fish kind.  Pity their greasiness doesn’t allow them slip away from nets…

Dominic’s favourite fish is Barry The Fish With Fingers.  But his Dad thinks it’s okay to eat other, less talented fish, and thusly consulted his new bible, the Baby Led Weaning cookbook.   Tuna croquettes were on the menu.  His top tip for speed is chop up the spuds & steam them in the microwave.  These were very quick to make, and after Mark sliced them into discs Dom nommed them up that way.  I think I spent more time cleaning potato & flaky tuna off the floor than he spent making them.  Then I gave the other tin of tuna to the cats, the bang* off it is woeful.

Then last sunday, while I revelled in delight at finding Cauldron tofu in Tesco (really firm, definitely the easiest to cook with, but not always available), Mark was slipping peppered mackerel fillets in the basket.   They ate them up on the next night with steamed babycorn & mangetout.  The packet said may contain traces of bone, but after a thorough combing through turns out they were actually bone-free.  Again, he ate small flaky bits with his hands.  The way he eats baby corn is really cute, its like an adult eating corn on the cob.  The tiny bits come back out with the sides nibbled off.

In case you’ve wondered, I don’t handle the meat/fish side of things at all, cooking or health & safety like bone removal.  I stand there making myself a little meal for one while father and son tuck in.  I don’t even like cleaning up after it, but then, when have I ever said I enjoy cleaning?

– jill

*bang is an irishism for smell, dear alien-readers.